A farm in the United States has been struck by ‘very virulent’ avian flu.

A farm in the United States has been struck by 'very virulent' avian flu.

The United States Department of Agriculture said on Wednesday that a very hazardous avian flu virus has been discovered in a commercial turkey flock in Dubois County, Indiana (Feb. 9). According to Reuters, 29,000 turkeys were slaughtered in order to prevent the spread of the sickness.

According to the USDA, the bird flu has the potential to infect poultry such as chickens and turkeys, as well as waterfowl such as ducks, geese, and shorebirds. According to the Des Moines Register, it was first detected in wild bird populations in North and South Carolina last month, and it has since spread across the country. Wild birds in eastern Canada were found to be infected with the virus at about the same time.

A farm in the United States has been struck by ‘very virulent’ avian flu

Then, according to the IndyStar, an Indiana farmer found over 100 dead turkeys in one of his barns on Monday (February 7). Following processing at Purdue University’s Indiana Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory, the samples were validated by the USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa. According to the results of the tests, the birds perished as a result of very pathogenic avian influenza

According to the USDA, the bird flu has the potential to infect poultry such as chickens and turkeys, as well as waterfowl such as ducks, geese, and shorebirds. According to the Des Moines Register, it was first detected in wild bird populations in North and South Carolina last month, and it has since spread across the country. Wild birds in eastern Canada were found to be infected with the virus at about the same time.

A farm in the United States has been struck by 'very virulent' avian flu.

Then, according to the IndyStar, an Indiana farmer found over 100 dead turkeys in one of his barns on Monday (February 7). Following processing at Purdue University’s Indiana Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory, the samples were validated by the USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa. According to the results of the tests, the birds perished as a result of very pathogenic avian influenza

According to the USDA, the presence of  in commercial poultry has not been established since 2020. According to Reuters, this is also the first H5N1 infection in commercial poultry in the state since 2016. According to IndyStar, nearly a dozen commercial flocks in the state were affected, resulting in the death of 400,000 birds.

As reported by the IndyStar, state officials acted quickly to quarantine the polluted land and neighbouring farms within 6.2 miles of the site (10 kilometres). As of this writing, the quarantine has affected 18 companies and probably a few hundred thousand birds, according to Denise Derrer Spears, a spokeswoman for the Indiana State Board of Animal Health. According to Derrer Spears, no further instances have been detected outside of the quarantine zone established by the original farm.